Update on Teen Hiring: Summer Employment Up 13%

Teenagers saw their strongest summer job gains in five years, as an improving economy and less competition from older job seekers helped nearly 1.4 million 16- to 19-year-olds find employment in May, June, and July, according to an analysis of non-seasonally adjusted jobs data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics by global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

Employment among 16- to 19-year-olds grew by 382,000 in July, the final month of the annual teen hiring period.  July job gains were up 26 percent from 2011, when teen employment increased by 302,000.  Overall, the number of employed teens grew by 1,397,000 from May through July, which represents a 29 percent increase from the previous summer, which saw 1,087,000 teens added to the employment rolls.

This summer’s job surge among teens was the largest since 2007, when teen employment experienced a net gain of 1,635,000 over the three-month hiring period.  Teen employment can be expected to shrink in August as 16- to 19-year-olds return to school.  Over the previous five years, the number of employed teenagers fell in August by an average of 523,000.   Continue reading

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Teen Summer Jobs Increase Over 2010

Teen Summer Job Outlook Final Update:

TEEN EMPLOYMENT IMPROVED BY 13% THIS SUMMER

As teenagers prepare to head back to school over the next couple of weeks, more will be doing so with a little extra money in their pockets thanks to a stronger summer job market.

Employment among 16- to 19-year-olds grew by a total of 1,087,000 from May through July, according to the latest analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs data by global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.  This summer’s job gains are up 13.2 percent from a year ago, when employment among teens grew by only 960,000, the fewest since 1949.

While the teen summer job market improved significantly from the anemic hiring activity in 2010, net employment gains still failed to match the 1,163,000 teen jobs added in 2009 and the 1,154,000 in 2008.  This summer’s job gains were well below pre-recession levels when, from 2004 through 2007, teen employment grew by an average of 1,674,000 jobs between May and July.

The teen summer job market might have been stronger had employers not scaled back the pace of hiring in July.  Only 302,000 net new jobs were found by 16- to 19-year-olds in July, which was down significantly from 2010, when a late summer hiring burst led to the creation of 457,000 new jobs for teens in July.  Between 2000 and 2010, July employment gains for teens averaged nearly 462,000, making the latest reading even more surprising.

“The drop-off in July employment gains among teens corresponded with a sudden increase in uncertainty about the strength of the economic recovery and subsequent decline in consumer confidence, stemming in part from the protracted debate in Washington over raising the debt limit,” saidJohn A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

“The debt ceiling resolution did not accomplish much when it comes to solving the long-term deficit problem.  The only thing the latest down-to-the wire, political gamesmanship really achieved was to further erode the public’s confidence inWashington’s ability to address the nation’s most pressing issues impacting economic growth and job creation.

“For business owners and store managers deciding whether to hire more workers in late June and early July, the growing uncertainty made the decision not to hire that much easier,” said Challenger.

 

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Year

May

June

July

Summer Jobs Gained

Change from Prior Year

1998

270,000

1,058,000

675,000

2,003,000

 
1999

415,000

750,000

852,000

2,017,000

0.7%

2000

111,000

1,087,000

311,000

1,509,000

-25.2%

2001

58,000

1,124,000

560,000

1,742,000

15.4%

2002

161,000

985,000

510,000

1,656,000

-4.9%

2003

152,000

859,000

458,000

1,469,000

-11.3%

2004

168,000

827,000

597,000

1,592,000

8.4%

2005

183,000

1,007,000

546,000

1,736,000

9.0%

2006

230,000

1,033,000

471,000

1,734,000

-0.1%

2007

62,000

1,114,000

459,000

1,635,000

-5.7%

2008

116,000

683,000

355,000

1,154,000

-29.4%

2009

111,000

698,000

354,000

1,163,000

0.8%

2010

6,000

497,000

457,000

960,000

-17.5%

2011

71,000

714,000

302,000

 1,087,000

13.2%

           
Source: Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. with data provided  
by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics    

 

Teen Employment Off To Stronger Start This Summer


The teen summer employment surge, which typically ramps up in May and peaks in June and July, got off to a stronger start this year.  The latest non-seasonally adjusted data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that employment among 16- to 19-year-olds grew by 71,000 in May.  That is well below the 125,000 new teen jobs averaged in May over the previous 10 years, but it represents a vast improvement over the 6,000 added in May 2010.  The June employment figures will provide the best picture of this year’s teen job market.  Last year, teen employment grew by 497,000 in June, down 29 percent from 698,000 in June 2009.  In 2007, before the recession, employment among 16- to 19-year-olds increased by 1,114,000 in June.   What are the biggest obstacles to strong teen employment growth this summer?  Is it too late for teenagers to find work now?  What can teenagers do to improve their chances of finding employment this summer?

Year

May

June

July

Summer Jobs Gained

Change from Prior Year

1998

270,000

1,058,000

675,000

2,003,000

 
1999

415,000

750,000

852,000

2,017,000

0.7%

2000

111,000

1,087,000

311,000

1,509,000

-25.2%

2001

58,000

1,124,000

560,000

1,742,000

15.4%

2002

161,000

985,000

510,000

1,656,000

-4.9%

2003

152,000

859,000

458,000

1,469,000

-11.3%

2004

168,000

827,000

597,000

1,592,000

8.4%

2005

183,000

1,007,000

546,000

1,736,000

9.0%

2006

230,000

1,033,000

471,000

1,734,000

-0.1%

2007

62,000

1,114,000

459,000

1,635,000

-5.7%

2008

116,000

683,000

355,000

1,154,000

-29.4%

2009

111,000

698,000

354,000

1,163,000

0.8%

2010

6,000

497,000

457,000

960,000

-17.5%

2011

71,000

????

????

71,000

 
           
Source: Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. with data provided  
by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics    

 

HP Ousts Hurd, Teen Employment Worst In 61 Years

The sudden ouster Hewlett-Packard CEO Mark Hurd after an investigation uncovered inaccurate expense reports and a questionable relationship with a contractor leaves many questions about the future of the tech company, as well as the future of the executive who leaves under a dark cloud of scandal. Hurd was credited with bringing much-needed stability to a company that struggled to find its footing after the dot.com collapse. Under Hurd’s leadership, HP surpassed Dell as the top PC maker and expanded further into computer services, networking equipment and smartphones. Can HP maintain the momentum started by Hurd? Will other companies overlook the scandal and consider Hurd for a CEO post? How does the Hurd situation compare to other scandals resulting in ousted CEOs?

In related news, Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. will release its report on July CEO turnover Wednesday, August 11, at 10:00 A.M. EDT.

* * *

Friday’s employment situation report confirmed that 2010 was the worst summer teen job market in 61 years. According to a Challenger analysis of the report, employment among 16- to 19-year-olds grew by just 960,000 jobs between May and the typical summer hiring peak of July. That is 17.5 percent fewer summer jobs than 2009 and the lowest summer hiring figure since 1949, when 932,000 teenagers found jobs during the summer months. The summer ended on a strong note, with employment growing by 457,000 in July. That was the largest July teen employment gain since 2007, when employment among the youngest workers grew by 459,000. The next bump in teen hiring usually occurs in December, as employers add teen job seekers on winter break. However, the winter surge is typically much smaller and short-lived. Why was teen hiring so much lower in a year that began to see job growth, compared to 2009 when the economy was still losing jobs? What will have to happen in the economy to see an improvement in summer hiring next year?

Teen Summer Job Search Tips

ADVICE FOR TEEN SUMMER JOB SEEKERS


Search where others are not. Outdoor jobs involving heavy labor or behind-the-scenes jobs are often not as sought-after by teen job seekers.


Look for odd jobs at odd hours. Offer to work evening and night shifts and to fill in for vacationing employees. As a job-search strategy, conduct a search for these types of positions during the hours they operate.


Become a door-to-door salesman when selling your skills. Do what good salesmen do — start on one block and go from business to business, door to door. Don’t simply ask for an application. Take the time to introduce yourself and build some rapport with the hiring manager.


Call relatives. Young people have not built much of a network; at least, the type of network needed to find a job. Relatives are often the best source for information on job leads.


Be a job-search ninja. Wait outside the store or offices of a prospective employer to attempt to intercept a hiring manager upon his or her arrival.


Dress for the part. Even if you are applying to work on a road crew, show up to all interviews in nice clothes. You want the interviewer to focus on you and your skills, not on your ripped jeans and paint-splattered t-shirt.


Be Punctual. If the interviewer says to be there at 4pm, don’t stroll in around 4:30. Customarily, interviewees should show up about 10-15 minutes before the designated time. You don’t want to show up too early; that may be viewed as a bother to the busy employer. Once you land a position, make sure to arrive on time for your shifts.


Turn Off The Cell Phone. Just like at a movie theater, cell phone noise is distracting, especially during a job interview or on-the-job training. Turn the cell phone completely off or set it to silent. Nothing is more off-putting to an employer than the constant buzz of incoming text-messages or phone calls. This includes MP3 players and video gaming devices. Your attention should be directed toward the task at hand at all times.


Don’t Forget To Smile. We all know how intimidating a job interview can be; however, if you think of it as just another conversation, you may be able to relax. Take a moment to breathe and smile from time to time. Employers want someone who is upbeat and has a good attitude, so make sure to display these attributes in the interview and while on the job.